4 Tips to Work as Digital Nomad Around the World

For those who have been bitten hard by the travel bug, nothing sounds better than the idea of being able to travel non-stop throughout the year. While most people may be excited to finally arrive home after a week away, you’re always the person asking, “OK, where are we going next?”

15 years ago, such life wouldn’t have been possible. Sure, there were business jobs that would have you constantly on the road, jetting across the country or to other countries, but that wasn’t really the same.

Now, through the almighty power of the internet and the rise of remote workers a digital nomad has come forth. These digital nomads do not strap their belongings to a camel, wander through the desert in search of an oasis or food, but instead, bring their possessions with them in a suitcase or backpack.

Not only are remote workers on the rise, but self-starting entrepreneurs. One of the best ways to fund your long-term travels is with a business in a growing field like ecommerce.

If you believe this is a potential path for you, check out our list of tips below to help you get started.

Not only are remote workers on the rise, but self-starting entrepreneurs. One of the best ways to fund your long-term travels is with a business in a growing field like ecommerce.

If you believe this is a potential path for you, check out our list of tips below to help you get started.

1. Establish a Routine

Even though working anywhere in the world sounds fantastic, it likely means you’re going to be working on your own. You could be bouncing from rental to rental or cafe to cafe, but the “where” doesn’t matter as much as the “when”.

Setting up a solid routine for yourself is the first big step in becoming a successful worker. If you want to get up early and work from 8-4 every day, then do that. If you enjoy sleeping in a bit and want to go from 10-6, make that your day.

Not only will this help you put yourself into “work mode”, but it’s also going to help you balance your work-life obligations. You need to be able to say to stick to your plans.

You may feel boxed in by a schedule and that’s the idea of a nomad, right? To wander and work from where and when your heart desires? If that’s the case. It’s still a great idea to find some kind of routine in order to make sure you’re getting the work done.

2. Be Ready to Work…A Lot

Your image of a digital nomad might be someone that wakes up on a beachside hotel, responds to a few emails before frolicking in the waves all day. At night, you head to the local club and dance the night away before coming home late. The next day, you wake up and do it all again.

As a digital nomad, you’ll be lucky to be able to hold a full-time job. You could be a freelancer or someone trying to start their own business. If so, then you’re used to this formula:

No work = no pay.

That means you might not be able to take sick days or vacation days as easily as others. You’re going to have to work extra hard on your pitches and resume since you won’t be able to present these ideas and show yourself in person.

Of course, you’re going to have plenty of great opportunities for yourself, but also be prepared to work incredibly hard to build up your resume and profile.

3. Brace For the Logistics

While you might choose to live and work in Indonesia, the company you’re doing business with is in California. That is a 14 hour time difference! While the company may be understanding with the time zones, they may still need to contact you at weird hours. You might need to be responding to a message on a Friday night when you’re out with friends.

Be prepared for the legal nightmare of bureaucracy and visas. While many countries let you stay up to three months visa free, others might have different requirements for entry into the country.

If you’re planning on staying long-term, you might want to look into various visas such as a business visa or a non-lucrative visa. It all depends on the kind of work you’re doing.

Let’s say you’re working in eCommerce. You go about finding the right domain name, making the website, etc. But, are there any legal restrictions about starting a business in that country? Will you have to set it up before you come?

While usually not a life-changing matter, it’s worth looking into.

4. Take Time to Adjust

Just like any big working change, it’s going to take awhile to get used to the new scenery. So don’t fret when you feel like you can’t get in a groove.

You might have to learn how to minimize distractions and create the best learning environment for yourself. Not to mention any local problems that might arise, such as lousy internet, language issues, or even where to find the best groceries.

You’re not just undergoing a work change, but a life change so cut yourself some slack.

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